November 07, 2013

2 Recent Studies Bode Well For E-cigs

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the-wonders-of-science-wallpapers

Two studies recently released on electronic cigarettes had fairly positive results.  One looked into the habits and actions of electronic cigarette users while the other looked into the effect electronic cigarette vapor constituents had on heart cells.

The first study comes from the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.  Researchers joined with the National Institute for Health Innovation at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and followed electronic cigarette user behavior for a full year.

You can read about the study right here.

The short version is that electronic cigarette users that had managed to quit smoking had a very low rate of relapse back into smoking (around 6%).  At the same time, electronic cigarette use appeared to contribute to a higher rate of smoking cessation.  The researchers concluded that electronic cigarettes were likely to both assist with smoking cessation and ongoing use may prevent relapse back into smoking.

This is promising because even the best “approved” quit methods are now appearing to fail to prevent relapse.  Some experts put the smoking relapse rate around 99% of ex-smokers.  If electronic cigarettes can not only help people quit, be keep them away from smoking again, they may rapidly prove to be the best quit method on the market as more research is done.

The second study came from Dr. Konstantinos Farsalinos, a common name in e-cig research and support based out of the Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center in Greece.  The study looked at the cytotoxic properties (that is, the likelihood of causing cell death) of extracted cigarette smoke and electronic cigarette vapor on cultured cardiomyblasts (heart cells).

You can read about the study right here.

Researchers found that although electronic cigarette exhibit a small degree of cytotoxicity, it was only at relatively high concentrations and well below the standard ISO 10993-5 definition of cytotoxicity (a national standard used to determine whether something should by considered cytotoxic).  All cigarette smoke samples were considered cytotoxic according to the same standard.

This is far from the first study to show electronic cigarette vapor to be miles away less dangerous than cigarette smoke.  But this is the first we’ve seen to look specifically at the effects on heart cells.  Overall, these bits of research are the kinds that can help determine that electronic cigarettes may not pose longterm danger without needing to wait 10 to 20 years to find out.

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